Archiv

Friedensprojekt 2006-2010 - Jüngste Soldaten

 


Debt of Honour Register
In Memory of

JOHN CONDON 

Private
6322
2nd Bn., Royal Irish Regiment

who died on
Monday 24 May 1915 . Age 14 .

Additional Information: Son of John and Mary Condon, of Waterford. Youngest known battle casualty of the war.
Cemetery: POELCAPELLE BRITISH CEMETERYLangemark-Poelkapelle, West-V., Belgium
Grave or Reference Panel Number: LVI. F. 8.
Location: Poelcapelle British Cemetery is located 10 kilometres north east of Ieper town centre on the Brugseweg (N313), a road connecting Ieper to Brugge. Two streets connect Ieper town centre onto the Brugseweg; Torhoutstraat leads from the market square onto the Kalfvaartstraat. At the end of Kalfvaartstraat is a large junction on which Brugseweg is the first right hand turning. The cemetery itself lies 10 kilometres along the Brugseweg on the right hand side of the road after passing through the village of Poelkapelle.
Historical Information: Poelcapelle (now Poelkapelle) was taken by the Germans from the French on the 20th October, 1914, entered by the 11th Division on the 4th October, 1917, evacuated by the British in April, 1918, and retaken by the Belgians on the 28th September, 1918. It has given its name to the battle of the 9th October, 1917, one of the Battles of Ypres. The village contains a monument to Captain Guynemer, the French airman, who fell in the neighbourhood in September, 1917. The commune contained a number of German Cemeteries; and close to the British Cemetery were POELCAPELLE EAST GERMAN CEMETERY, made by the Germans, and POELCAPELLE NEW GERMAN CEMETERY, made by British burial parties after the Armistice. Poelcapelle British Cemetery was made after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from other cemeteries and from the battlefields. The great majority of the dead who now rest in it fell in the last five months of 1917, and particularly in the month of October, but certain plots (IA, VIA, VIIA, LI and LXI) contain many graves of 1914 and 1915. There are now nearly 7,500, 1914-18 and 1, 1939-45 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, over 6,200 from the 1914-18 War are unidentified and special memorials are erected to eight soldiers from the United Kingdom and one from the Channel Islands known or believed to be buried here. Other special memorials record the names of 24 soldiers from the United Kingdom and three from Canada, buried by the enemy, whose graves could not be found. The cemetery covers an area of 22,586 square metres and is enclosed by a low red brick wall. The following were among the burial grounds from which British graves were removed to this cemetery:- HOUTHULST FOREST NEW MILITARY CEMETERY, LANGEMARCK, near the South side of the Forest, on the road from Poelcapelle to Houthulst. Here were buried a number of French soldiers, as well as 21 soldiers and two airmen from the United Kingdom, who fell in the winter of 1917-18. KEERSELAERE FRENCH CEMETERY, LANGEMARCK, 800 metres West of the hamlet of Keerselaere, in which 29 French soldiers, five Canadian and two from the United Kingdom were buried in 1915, apparently by the enemy. PILCKEM ROAD GERMAN CEMETERY, LANGEMARCK, on the South-West side of the bridge over the Hannebeek, in which 13 soldiers from the United Kingdom and one from Canada were buried by the enemy in 1914-17. POELCAPELLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY, in which one soldier from the United Kingdom was buried in 1915. POELCAPELLE GERMAN CEMETERY NO.2, about 1.6 kilometres South-East of the village, which contained the graves of 96 soldiers from the United Kingdom and Canada who fell in 1914-15. ST. JEAN CHURCHYARD, in which 44 soldiers from the United Kingdom were buried in 1915, but which was completely destroyed in later fighting. STADEN FRENCH MILITARY CEMETERY, made by the 169th Infantry Regiment and containing the graves of 80 French soldiers and one R.A.F. Officer. VIJFWEGEN GERMAN CEMETERY NO.1, close to the railway halte, in which three soldiers from the United Kingdom were buried by the enemy.

Debt of Honour Register
In Memory of

VALENTINE JOE STRUDWICK 

Rifleman
5750
8th Bn., Rifle Brigade

who died on
Friday 14 January 1916 . Age 15 .

Additional Information: Son of Louisa Strudwick, of 70, Orchard Rd., Dorking. One of the youngest battle casualties of the war.
Cemetery: ESSEX FARM CEMETERY Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Grave or Reference Panel Number: I. U. 8.
Location: Boezinge is a village in the province of West Flanders, north of Ieper on the Diksmuidseweg road (N369). From the station turn left into M.Fochlaan and go to the roundabout. Then turn right and continue to the next roundabout. Turn left and drive to the next roundabout and then turn right into Oude Veurnestraat. Take the 2nd turning on the left, which is the Diksmuidseweg, and follow the road under the motorway bridge; the Cemetery will be found on the right hand side of the road.
Historical Information: The land south of Essex Farm was used as a dressing station cemetery from April 1915 to August 1917. The burials were made without definite plan and some of the divisions which occupied this sector may be traced in almost every part of the cemetery, but the 49th (West Riding) Division buried their dead of 1915 in Plot I, and the 38th (Welsh) Division used Plot III in the autumn of 1916. There are 1,199 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 102 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate 19 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield. It was in Essex Farm Cemetery that Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae of the Canadian Army Medical Corps wrote the poem ' In Flanders Fields' in May 1915. The 49th Division Memorial is immediately behind the cemetery, on the canal bank.

 


 

Debt of Honour Register
In Memory of

ALFRED BOOTHAM 

Privates
2236
2nd Bn., Manchester Regiment

who died on
Wednesday 9 June 1915 . Age 16 .

Additional Information: Son of Martha Ann Bootham, of 5, Grimshaw St., Gorton, Manchester.
Cemetery: CHESTER FARM CEMETERY    Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Grave or Reference Panel Number: I. A. 8.
Location: Chester Farm Military Cemetery is located 4 km south east of Ieper town centre, on the Vaartstraat, a road leading from the Komenseweg connecting Ieper to Komen (N336). From Ieper town centre the Komenseweg is located via the Rijselsestraat, through the Rijselpoort (Lille Gate) and crossing the Ieper ring road, towards Armentieres and Lille. The road name then changes to Rijselseweg. 1 km along the Rijselseweg lies the left hand turning onto the Komenseweg. 2.3 km along the Komenseweg lies the right hand turning onto Vaartstraat. The cemetery is located 1.5 km along the Vaartstraat on the right hand side of the road.
Historical Information: The cemetery was begun in March 1915 and was used by front line troops until November 1917. Plot I contains the graves of 92 officers and men of the 2nd Manchesters, who died in April-July 1915 and there are 72 London Regiment burials elsewhere in the Cemetery. There are 420 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. Seven of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate six casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. The cemetery covers an area of 3,045 square metres and is enclosed by a wall.

Debt of Honour Register
In Memory of

R H REEVES 

Private
19544
6th Bn., Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

who died on
Friday 8 October 1915 . Age 15 .

Cemetery: SPOILBANK CEMETERY   Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Grave or Reference Panel Number: I. H. 19.
Location: Spoilbank Cemetery is located 4.5 km south east of Ieper town centre, on the Vaartstraat, a road leading from the Komenseweg connecting Ieper to Komen (N336). From Ieper town centre the Komenseweg is located via the Rijselsestraat, through the Rijselpoort (Lille Gate) and crossing the Ieper ring road, towards Armentieres and Lille. The road name then changes to Rijselseweg. 1 km along the Rijselseweg lies the left hand turning onto Komenseweg. 2.3 km along the Komenseweg lies the right hand turning onto Vaartstraat. The cemetery is located 1.6 km along the Vaartstraat on the right hand side of the road.
Historical Information: The village and most of the commune of Zillebeke were in British hands during the greater part of the War; but the number of cemeteries in the neighbourhood bears witness to the fierce fighting of which it was the scene, even under conditions of trench warfare, from 1914 to 1918. The Ypres-Comines canal (now disused) ran South-East from Ypres between Zillebeke and Voormezeele; and about 2 kilometres South-West of Zillebeke village, where it approaches the old front line, its bed lies between banks of spoil thrown up when it was made. Near the North side of it is "Chester Farm", and near the farm are Chester Farm and Spoilbank Cemeteries, the latter of which was sometimes called Chester Farm Lower Cemetery or Gordon Terrace Cemetery. Spoilbank Cemetery was begun in February, 1915, and used by troops holding this sector until March, 1918. It is particularly associated with the casualties of the 2nd Suffolks on "The Bluff" early in 1916. It was enlarged after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the battlefields of Ypres. There are now over 500, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, over a quarter are unidentified and special memorials are erected to ten soldiers from the United Kingdom and one from Australia, known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery covers an area of 4,160 square metres and is enclosed by a curb.

Debt of Honour Register
In Memory of

Archibald Laird Gardiner 

Private
5027
The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment)

who died on
5th November 1915. Age 15 .

Cemetery: SPOILBANK CEMETERY   Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Grave or Reference Panel Number: I. H. 19.
Location: Spoilbank Cemetery is located 4.5 km south east of Ieper town centre, on the Vaartstraat, a road leading from the Komenseweg connecting Ieper to Komen (N336). From Ieper town centre the Komenseweg is located via the Rijselsestraat, through the Rijselpoort (Lille Gate) and crossing the Ieper ring road, towards Armentieres and Lille. The road name then changes to Rijselseweg. 1 km along the Rijselseweg lies the left hand turning onto Komenseweg. 2.3 km along the Komenseweg lies the right hand turning onto Vaartstraat. The cemetery is located 1.6 km along the Vaartstraat on the right hand side of the road.
Historical Information: The village and most of the commune of Zillebeke were in British hands during the greater part of the War; but the number of cemeteries in the neighbourhood bears witness to the fierce fighting of which it was the scene, even under conditions of trench warfare, from 1914 to 1918. The Ypres-Comines canal (now disused) ran South-East from Ypres between Zillebeke and Voormezeele; and about 2 kilometres South-West of Zillebeke village, where it approaches the old front line, its bed lies between banks of spoil thrown up when it was made. Near the North side of it is "Chester Farm", and near the farm are Chester Farm and Spoilbank Cemeteries, the latter of which was sometimes called Chester Farm Lower Cemetery or Gordon Terrace Cemetery. Spoilbank Cemetery was begun in February, 1915, and used by troops holding this sector until March, 1918. It is particularly associated with the casualties of the 2nd Suffolks on "The Bluff" early in 1916. It was enlarged after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the battlefields of Ypres. There are now over 500, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, over a quarter are unidentified and special memorials are erected to ten soldiers from the United Kingdom and one from Australia, known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery covers an area of 4,160 square metres and is enclosed by a curb.
Information from the book "Boy Soldiers" by Richard van Emden Seventeen-year-old Londoner Archie Gardiner belonged to the category of the exceptionally unlucky. During his battalion's three-day tour in the line close to Ypres he was the sole fatality, shot by a sniper as he inadvertently raised his head above the parapet.

Archie had enlisted in the Queen's Royal West Surreys with his best friend Edgar Lee. Both were aged sixteen and lived just a few doors apart in Greenvale Road, Eltham. They had grown up together, serving side by side in the 1st Royal Eltham Scouts. Archie was a little older than his friend and had gained a reputation for being mischievous, and it is possible his parents thought the Army might do him some good, for neither objected when he went to join up.

Archie had been serving an engineering apprenticeship at Woolwich Polytechnic. He had never been the most conscientious student and his first year's training had been marked as only 'fair'. It was during his second year, coinciding with the outbreak of war, that Archie's work slipped badly. His attendance dropped and his tutors were not happy with his conduct, marking his report 'Unsatisfactory. Slack and inattentive'. It was to no one's surprise when, in early March 1915, Edgar and Archie enlisted. They were given the consecutive regimental numbers 5026 and 5027 and, being staunch friends, they sought to stick together, embarking for France on the last day of August 1915 with the 8th (Service) Battalion.

They had not been overseas very long when, one wet November night, the battalion arrived in the line near the shattered village of Dickebusch to find the trenches waterlogged and in desperate need of draining, hi places, the sodden parapet had simply collapsed and it was while" undertaking repairs that Archie was hit and killed.

Edgar Lee wrote a short note to Archie-'s parents.

I am writing this in the trenches. I have just come back from seeing poor old Archie. He was killed by a sniper this morning about 10.30 a.m. He was shot just above the right eye with an explosive bullet and death was instantaneous. I am sorry there is no mistake about it because I went and saw him myself.

The depth of Edgar's loss was terrible. 'I miss him more than you at the time, being with him every day,' he wrote. The battalion war diary briefly noted: 'Quiet days, our snipers gained the upper hand easily.' Unusually, Archie's death was not recorded. His local newspaper, the Eltham and District Times, later published a farewell to its local lad, mourning the passing of 'a true British boy'. It said, 'He always played the game and he played it to the end.' Archie was buried in Spoilbank Cemetery, four kilometres south-east of Ypres. Two days after he was killed, his battalion left the line.

The sniper who killed Archie may have hidden himself in the ground between the German first and second lines. Alternatively, he may have been shooting from within the trench, carefully concealed behind an iron shield built in the parapet. These shields gave considerable protection to the snipers, who used just a small aperture in the half-inch-thick plate through which to shoot, knowing they were safe from all but the most accurate of retaliatory shots.

It took a steady hand and a keen eye to be effective, and snipers were

frequently young, although Second Lieutenant Stuart Cloete's 'best

sniper' was perhaps something of a record. The boy turned out to be

only fourteen years old.

He was the finest shot and the best little soldier I had. A very nice boy, always happy. I got him a Military Medal and when he went back to Blighty and I suppose school, he had a credit of six Germans hit.

 


 

Debt of Honour Register
In Memory of

FRED STOREY 



Private
489375
18th Bn., Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regt.)

who died on
Friday 30 June 1916 . Age 16 .

Additional information: Son of Robert J. and Alice M. Storey, of 16, Geary St., Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.  
Cemetery: BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY
Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Grave or Reference Panel Number: Enclosure No.4 I. M. 9.
Location: Bedford House Cemetery is located 2.5 Km south of Ieper town centre. The cemetery lies on the Rijselseweg (N365), the road connecting Ieper to Armentieres. From Ieper town centre the Rijselsestraat runs from the market square, through the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort) and directly over the crossroads with the Ieper ring road. The road name then changes to the Rijselseweg. The cemetery itself is located 2 Km after this crossroads on the left hand side of the Rijselseweg.
Historical Information: Zillebeke village and most of the commune were in British hands during the greater part of the War; but the number of cemeteries in the neighbourhood bears witness to the fierce fighting in the vicinity from 1914 to 1918. Bedford House, sometimes known as Woodcote House, were the names given by the Army to the Chateau Rosendal, 1,830 metres South of the Lille Gate of Ypres. It was a country house in a small wooded park, with moats. It never fell into enemy hands, but the house and the trees were gradually destroyed by shell fire. It was used by Field Ambulances, and as the Headquarters of Brigades and other fighting units; and charcoal pits were started in October, 1917. The property became, in time, largely covered by small cemeteries. Five Enclosures existed at the date of the Armistice; but the graves from No. 1 were then removed to White House Cemetery, St. Jean, and those from No. 5 to Aeroplane Cemetery, Ypres. Enclosure No. 2 was begun in December, 1915, and used until October, 1918; and after the Armistice 437 graves were added, all but four of which came from the Ecole de Bienfaisance and Asylum British Cemeteries, both at Ypres. There are over 30 unidentified graves and special memorials are erected (in No. 4) to 24 United Kingdom soldiers and one Australian, known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials (in No. 2) record the names of two United Kingdom soldiers, buried in the two cemeteries at Ypres, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. Certain graves in Plots VII, VIII and XV, identified collectively but not individually, are marked by headstones superscribed: 'Buried near this spot'. Enclosure No. 3, the smallest, was used from February, 1915, to December, 1916; the burials in August-October, 1915, were largely carried out by the 17th Division. Enclosure No. 4, the largest, was used from June, 1916, to February, 1918, largely by the 47th (London) Division; and after the Armistice it was enlarged by the concentration of 3,324 graves from other burial grounds and from the battlefields of the Ypres Salient. Almost two-thirds of the graves are unidentified and special memorials are erected to 20 soldiers from the United Kingdom known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials record the names of 25 soldiers from the United Kingdom, buried in other cemeteries, whose graves could not be found. Enclosure No. 6 was made in 1930's from the concentration of graves from the battlefield of the Ypres Salient. There are also graves of the 1939-1945 War, all of them soldiers of the British Army, who died in the defence of the Ypres-Comines canal and railway at the end of May 1940. It lies on high ground on the west side of the cemetery. There are now 5142, 1914-18 and 66, 1939-45 Commonwealth war casualties commemorated in all four sites, 3014 casualties of the first world war are unidentified. Also commemorated here are 2 Foreign National casualties. Enclosures 2, 3, and 4 cover an area of 21,541 square metres. They are bounded on the North by a moat and on the other sides by a rubble wall. The following were burial grounds from which British graves were concentrated to Bedford House:- ASYLUM BRITISH CEMETERY, YPRES, was established in the grounds of a mental hospital (the Hospice du Sacre Caeur) a little West of the railway station, between the Poperinghe road and the railway. It was used by Field Ambulances and fighting units from February, 1915, to November, 1917, and it contained the graves of 265 soldiers from the United Kingdom, nine from Canada, seven from Australia and two of the British West Indies Regiment. BOESINGHE FRENCH CEMETERY No. 2, a little South of Bard Cottage, contained the grave of one soldier from the United Kingdom. DROOGENBROODHOEK GERMAN CEMETERY, MOORSLEDE, contained the graves of two United Kingdom soldiers who fell in October, 1914. ECOLE DE BIENFAISANCE CEMETERY, YPRES, was on the North side of the Poperinghe road, immediately West of the railway, in the grounds of a school (now rebuilt). It was used by Field Ambulances in 1915-1917, and it contained the graves of 133 soldiers from the United Kingdom, three from Canada, three from Australia and one of the British West Indies Regiment. KERKHOVE CHURCHYARD contained the graves of five United Kingdom soldiers, who fell in October and November, 1918, and seven German. POELCAPELLE GERMAN CEMETERY No. 4, between Langemarck and the Poelcapelle-St. Julien road, contained the graves of 52 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell in 1914 and 1916. ZONNEBEKE BRITISH CEMETERIES No. 1 and No. 3 were on the South and North sides respectively of the Broodseinde-Zonnebeke road. Zonnebeke was occupied by the Germans on the 22nd October, 1914, retaken by the French on the following day, and evacuated at the beginning of May, 1915; retaken by British troops on the 26th September, 1917; evacuated again in April, 1918; and retaken by Belgian troops on the 28th September, 1918. Four British Cemeteries were made by the Germans on the Broodseinde-Zonnebeke road; No. 1 contained the graves of 31 United Kingdom soldiers (mainly 2nd East Surrey) who fell in April, 1915, and No. 3 those of 69 who fell in April, and May, 1915.

[Hier geht´s zur Projektübersicht]

   
Copyright © 2018 Europaschule Friesenschule Leer. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.
Joomla! ist freie, unter der GNU/GPL-Lizenz veröffentlichte Software.